SBC News Netherlands online gambling advertising spend reaches €23m

Netherlands online gambling advertising spend reaches €23m

Rates of gambling advertising have increased significantly in the Netherlands since the launch of the online gambling market, with the total spend of the 11 licensed operators standing at €23 million.

Local outlet de Volkskrant, after requesting information from television research agency Nielsen, reported that the highest advertising spend was recorded by the state-owned companies Holland Casino and Toto spent the most money on advertisements.

The two firm’s’ gross media spending in the past two months was around €6.4 million and €4.5 million respectively. Nielsen used the rate cards of television channels and websites, with any discounts or individual price agreements not taken into account, in order to calculate these figures.

In October and November, Nielsen went live with a total of more than 366,000 betting ads on television and on the internet, in comparison to just over 170,000 for the same month in 2020. 

Meanwhile, three out of four gambling advertisements have focused on casinos’ digital offerings since the legislation of online wagering. According to the research group’s figures, around 88 per cent of gambling advertisements appear on websites and social media.

It was reported in de Volkskrant that both Holland Casino and Toto responded by to the figures by stating that “they do not aim to outdo competitors with their advertisements” with their aim to direct players “to the safe, responsible and legal offer of online games of chance”.

In addition, the companies pointed out that they were one of the first casinos to be licensed, which allowed them to start advertising early.

Under current official advertising rules televised gambling advertisements between 6am and 7pm are prohibited, and commercials cannot feature endorsements by individuals under the age of 25 or target those in the age bracket of 18-to-24, and sporting figures are banned from promoting betting and gaming firms. 

Additionally, advertising content cannot recommend gambling as a means of making money to players, and detailed terms and conditions on any offered bonuses must be displayed across all marketing campaigns.

The Dutch Gambling Authority, the Kansspelautoriteit (KSA), issued its first sanction against one of the 11 licenced operators last week for advertising violations, penalising an unnamed firm for misleading advertising.

Last Thursday, the Dutch House of Representatives passed a motion calling on the government to ban ‘untargeted advertisements for risky games of chance’, which include television commercials. Furthermore, the House wants to introduce a daytime ban on all online-based gambling advertisements.

Sander Dekker, the outgoing Minister for Legal Protection, had advised against the motion, with de Volkskrant citing “he thinks it is still ‘too early’ for such an advertising ban”.

Since October, casinos in the Netherlands have been allowed to offer online games of chance such as poker and roulette. The Dutch Gaming Authority granted licences to 11 casinos and allowed them to advertise its games on television and radio from 9pm, in an attempt to entice players who may have been using illegal and overseas gambling sites to switch to the new regulated market.

Check Also

SBC News KSA: Govt intervention ‘the obvious choice’ if industry fails to self-regulate

KSA: Govt intervention ‘the obvious choice’ if industry fails to self-regulate

Public debate on the prevalence of gambling advertising in the Netherlands following last year’s re-regulation …

SBC News KSA reminds operators of role model ban ahead of implementation

KSA reminds operators of role model ban ahead of implementation

The Dutch Gaming Authority, Kansspelautoriteit (KSA), has issued a reminder to operators active in the …

SBC News New Dutch gambling minister positive of initial KOA safeguards

New Dutch gambling minister positive of initial KOA safeguards

New Dutch Justice Minister, Franc Weerwind has cited caution in how the government should approach …