Viral catches pool betting licence for FantasyBet

fantasybetViral, the licensed white label multi-channel casino and betting solutions provider, has been awarded a UK pool betting licence for its daily fantasy sports operator brand called FantasyBet.

FantasyBet is targeting the high growth in live daily fantasy sports games that are popular in the United Kingdom and across Europe. The brand has introduced a combination of innovative daily fantasy sports features such as ‘Flash Mode’.

The feature means fantasy managers have only three minutes to set-up and submit a team, which adds further to the social gaming and in-play entertainment elements of the game for players.

Viktor Enoksen, Director of FantasyBet, commented: “Our daily live games use the same premise as traditional season-long games. It means players of season-long games can transition to daily game formats easily without having to learn new game rules. We also introduced unique game features such as Player List games. These provide each fantasy manager a unique challenge to put their fantasy football skills and knowledge to the test.”

Daniel Eriksson, CEO of Viral, added: “We are delighted to be working with FantasyBet. Season-long fantasy football has been popular for many years, but short-term fantasy sports and social gaming products that typically last for one game week are growing in popularity.

“With us, FantasyBet was connected to a modular platform and our API connection technology was a key element in making the integration work smoothly, which demonstrates the versatility of our technology platform.”

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